Drink and Drug driving

It's not worth the risk

In the last 50 years road casualties caused by drink driving have fallen dramatically, but in 2013, there were still 240 deaths due to drink driving – accounting for 14% of all road fatalities. By drinking and driving, you risk your life, those of your passengers and others on the road.

THINK! A second drink can double your chance of a fatal collision








It is illegal to drive if your driving is impaired by drugs or if you have certain drugs above a specified level in your blood. Seventeen legal and illegal drugs are covered by the law, including cannabis, cocaine, ecstasy and ketamine. The limits for all illegal drugs are extremely low – taking even a very small amount of an illegal drug could put you over the limit.

If the police stop you and think you’re on drugs they will either test you at the roadside using a drug screening device or a "Field Impairment" test to assess your ability to drive.

If drugs are detected in your system or you are deemed impaired by drugs, you’ll be arrested and taken to a police station for blood or urine tests. If the tests show you've taken drugs or show a specified drug above the specified blood limits you could be charged with drug driving.

You don't have to be on illegal drugs to be impaired to drive – prescription or over-the-counter medicines can also impair your ability to drive. If you’re taking medicines, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or healthcare professional before driving. 

Being under the influence of alcohol or drugs can impair your ability to make decisions, which when behind the wheel of a vehicle is dangerous. 

On 2 March 2015 the drug driving law changed to make it easier for the police to catch and convict drug drivers. It is now an offence to drive with certain drugs above a specified level in your blood - just as it is with drink driving. 

The new offence will work alongside the existing offence of driving whilst impaired through drink or drugs